The Cities and States With the Biggest Tax Procrastinators #infographic - Visualistan

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The Cities and States With the Biggest Tax Procrastinators

As Tax Day nears this year, many people loathe filing their taxes. Even with the tax filing deadline extended, many Americans will put off filing their taxes until the very last minutes.

A new study by IPX 1031 took a look at the subject of tax procrastinators. In the study, they examined the biggest tax procrastinators both on the state level and on the city level. They also examined when Americans filed their taxes in 2019 by analyzing IRS data to specifically see the most popular weeks for tax filing. This data was also supplemented by a survey of 1,000 Americas about Tax Day. In the survey, they asked respondents to identify when Tax Day was, asked about expected tax refund amounts and how people plan on using their refund check. Let’s examine the major takeaways of the study from IPX 1031.

The Biggest Tax Procrastinators by State

Using Google search trends data from the 2019 tax filing season, IPX 1031 was able to see which states were searching for common tax-related questions and keywords the most. Listed below is the full list of the biggest tax procrastinators by state. Searches related to tax filing deadline were done on a per capita basis per every 100,000 residents.

California (443)
Nevada (413)
Texas (392)
Colorado (385)
Oregon (375)
Washington (366)
Hawaii (361)
Georgia (355)
Arizona (336)
Maryland (333)
Florida (323)
Massachusetts (320)
New York (319)
Virginia (310)
North Carolina (306)
Arkansas (302)
Illinois (291)
Tennessee (288)
Utah (283)
New Mexico (276)
New Jersey (274)
Louisiana (273)
Delaware (270)
Rhode Island (270)
Connecticut (265)
South Carolina (263)
Alabama (263)
Minnesota (261)
Oklahoma (251)
Vermont (249)
New Hampshire (240)
Idaho (235)
Kentucky (233)
Montana (231)
Kansas (228)
Maine (226)
Ohio (223)
Arizona (221)
North Dakota (221)
Indiana (220)
Wyoming (220)
Missouri (218)
Pennsylvania (213)
Wisconsin (212)
Michigan (210)
Nebraska (206)
Mississippi (204)
West Virginia (189)
Iowa (175)
South Dakota (175)


Biggest Tax Procrastinators by City

The second part of the analysis was similar to the one above but instead examined the 30 largest cities in the U.S. to see which big city has the most tax filing procrastinators.

Las Vegas (1,108)
Denver (1,058)
Seattle (988)
San Francisco (911)
Washington D.C. (901)
Portland (863)
Austin (846)
Baltimore (763)
Dallas (752)
Houston (726)
Boston (698)
Nashville (684)
Los Angeles (679)
San Diego (678)
San Jose (661)
Charlotte (618)
Chicago (593)
Fort Worth (516)
Oklahoma City (485)
Philadelphia (449)
Louisville (448)
New York City (446)
Phoenix (440)
El Paso (428)
Jacksonville (419)
Memphis (418)
Indianapolis (413)
Detroit (410)
Columbus (410)
San Antonio (403)


When Americans File Their Taxes the Most

The next part of the analysis examined the most popular weeks that you can file. This data was sourced directly from the IRS. This may not be surprising, but the most popular week to file your taxes without an extension is the very last week before Tax Day. The second most popular week is a bit more surprising. The first week of tax filing season is actually the second most popular week to file your taxes. After the first week, the amount of tax returns filed slowly decline until around the week of March 15th in which there is a steady climb in the amount of tax returns filed peaking the week of May 15th.


When is Tax Day?

The next part of the study from IPX 1031 surveyed over 1,000 Americans to learn more about their tax-filing habits. Shockingly enough, 23% of all surveyed respondents were not able to identify May 15th as Tax Day in America.

The survey also asked about the expected tax refund amount that Americans expect to receive this year. Listed below is the generational breakdown of expected tax refund amount:

Gen Z - $1,338

Millennials - $2,476

Gen X - $1,433

Baby Boomers - $946

Average of all responses - $1,982


How Americans Plan to Use Their Refund

Listed below is a breakdown of how Americans said they plan to use their tax refund this year:

Paying off debt – 39%

Saving it – 31%

Investing it – 14%

Planning a vacation – 8%

Making a major life purchase - 4%

Other -4%

The survey also asked about owing money to the IRS and filing a tax extension. Only 30% of surveyed respondents said they were worried about owing money to the IRS this year. With that, only 24% of surveyed respondents said they have filed for a tax extension. 29% of respondents said they have turned to a tax professional because filing online was too complicated for them.

The full results from the study on American’s biggest tax procrastinators can be seen in the graphics below. The methodology for the study was a mix of Google search trends data, data directly from the IRS and a survey of over 1,000 Americans that was performed in February of this year. The study also features two interactive maps where you can see the search volume for each state and city that was analyzed.

The Cities and States With the Biggest Tax Procrastinators #infographic


infographic by: www.ipx1031.com

Share This Infographic On Your Site

The Cities and States With the Biggest Tax Procrastinators #infographic

The Cities and States With the Biggest Tax Procrastinators

As Tax Day nears this year, many people loathe filing their taxes. Even with the tax filing deadline extended, many Americans will put off filing their taxes until the very last minutes.

A new study by IPX 1031 took a look at the subject of tax procrastinators. In the study, they examined the biggest tax procrastinators both on the state level and on the city level. They also examined when Americans filed their taxes in 2019 by analyzing IRS data to specifically see the most popular weeks for tax filing. This data was also supplemented by a survey of 1,000 Americas about Tax Day. In the survey, they asked respondents to identify when Tax Day was, asked about expected tax refund amounts and how people plan on using their refund check. Let’s examine the major takeaways of the study from IPX 1031.

The Biggest Tax Procrastinators by State

Using Google search trends data from the 2019 tax filing season, IPX 1031 was able to see which states were searching for common tax-related questions and keywords the most. Listed below is the full list of the biggest tax procrastinators by state. Searches related to tax filing deadline were done on a per capita basis per every 100,000 residents.

California (443)
Nevada (413)
Texas (392)
Colorado (385)
Oregon (375)
Washington (366)
Hawaii (361)
Georgia (355)
Arizona (336)
Maryland (333)
Florida (323)
Massachusetts (320)
New York (319)
Virginia (310)
North Carolina (306)
Arkansas (302)
Illinois (291)
Tennessee (288)
Utah (283)
New Mexico (276)
New Jersey (274)
Louisiana (273)
Delaware (270)
Rhode Island (270)
Connecticut (265)
South Carolina (263)
Alabama (263)
Minnesota (261)
Oklahoma (251)
Vermont (249)
New Hampshire (240)
Idaho (235)
Kentucky (233)
Montana (231)
Kansas (228)
Maine (226)
Ohio (223)
Arizona (221)
North Dakota (221)
Indiana (220)
Wyoming (220)
Missouri (218)
Pennsylvania (213)
Wisconsin (212)
Michigan (210)
Nebraska (206)
Mississippi (204)
West Virginia (189)
Iowa (175)
South Dakota (175)


Biggest Tax Procrastinators by City

The second part of the analysis was similar to the one above but instead examined the 30 largest cities in the U.S. to see which big city has the most tax filing procrastinators.

Las Vegas (1,108)
Denver (1,058)
Seattle (988)
San Francisco (911)
Washington D.C. (901)
Portland (863)
Austin (846)
Baltimore (763)
Dallas (752)
Houston (726)
Boston (698)
Nashville (684)
Los Angeles (679)
San Diego (678)
San Jose (661)
Charlotte (618)
Chicago (593)
Fort Worth (516)
Oklahoma City (485)
Philadelphia (449)
Louisville (448)
New York City (446)
Phoenix (440)
El Paso (428)
Jacksonville (419)
Memphis (418)
Indianapolis (413)
Detroit (410)
Columbus (410)
San Antonio (403)


When Americans File Their Taxes the Most

The next part of the analysis examined the most popular weeks that you can file. This data was sourced directly from the IRS. This may not be surprising, but the most popular week to file your taxes without an extension is the very last week before Tax Day. The second most popular week is a bit more surprising. The first week of tax filing season is actually the second most popular week to file your taxes. After the first week, the amount of tax returns filed slowly decline until around the week of March 15th in which there is a steady climb in the amount of tax returns filed peaking the week of May 15th.


When is Tax Day?

The next part of the study from IPX 1031 surveyed over 1,000 Americans to learn more about their tax-filing habits. Shockingly enough, 23% of all surveyed respondents were not able to identify May 15th as Tax Day in America.

The survey also asked about the expected tax refund amount that Americans expect to receive this year. Listed below is the generational breakdown of expected tax refund amount:

Gen Z - $1,338

Millennials - $2,476

Gen X - $1,433

Baby Boomers - $946

Average of all responses - $1,982


How Americans Plan to Use Their Refund

Listed below is a breakdown of how Americans said they plan to use their tax refund this year:

Paying off debt – 39%

Saving it – 31%

Investing it – 14%

Planning a vacation – 8%

Making a major life purchase - 4%

Other -4%

The survey also asked about owing money to the IRS and filing a tax extension. Only 30% of surveyed respondents said they were worried about owing money to the IRS this year. With that, only 24% of surveyed respondents said they have filed for a tax extension. 29% of respondents said they have turned to a tax professional because filing online was too complicated for them.

The full results from the study on American’s biggest tax procrastinators can be seen in the graphics below. The methodology for the study was a mix of Google search trends data, data directly from the IRS and a survey of over 1,000 Americans that was performed in February of this year. The study also features two interactive maps where you can see the search volume for each state and city that was analyzed.

The Cities and States With the Biggest Tax Procrastinators #infographic


infographic by: www.ipx1031.com

Share This Infographic On Your Site

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