The History of Translations (Past, Present and Future) #infographic - Visualistan

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The History of Translations (Past, Present and Future)

In the past, the translators were unnamed, unknown and uncredited although their works led to many dramatic changes in society. They worked diligently to deliver accurate translations of various texts for science, education, philosophy, religion, business, health, politics and more. In recent years, some translators became famous due to their translations of classic literature, ensuring that more people would be able to enjoy these literary masterpieces in their own language.

Constance Garnett, a British translator, became very popular because of her translations of Russian classics, penned by some of the most famous Russian writers and novelists, such as Dostoyevski, Chekhov, Tolstoy, Gogol, and Turgenev. We have prepared an infographic to show you more.

Rules about translation were noted since the time of the first translators. The consolidation of the rules and guidelines of translation first came about during the Industrial Revolution in the 19th century, although the guidelines were not followed, particularly by those translators who were in high demand.

In the 20th century, the structures in translation became firmer and modern translators learned from their mistakes in the past and corrected them. They wanted translations that not only converted the content into another language but translate its context as well so that readers could better understand the original author's message. Learn more about the history of translations in our specially created infographic

The History of Translations (Past, Present and Future) #infographic
infographic by: daytranslations.com

Share This Infographic On Your Site

The History of Translations (Past, Present and Future) #infographic

The History of Translations (Past, Present and Future)

In the past, the translators were unnamed, unknown and uncredited although their works led to many dramatic changes in society. They worked diligently to deliver accurate translations of various texts for science, education, philosophy, religion, business, health, politics and more. In recent years, some translators became famous due to their translations of classic literature, ensuring that more people would be able to enjoy these literary masterpieces in their own language.

Constance Garnett, a British translator, became very popular because of her translations of Russian classics, penned by some of the most famous Russian writers and novelists, such as Dostoyevski, Chekhov, Tolstoy, Gogol, and Turgenev. We have prepared an infographic to show you more.

Rules about translation were noted since the time of the first translators. The consolidation of the rules and guidelines of translation first came about during the Industrial Revolution in the 19th century, although the guidelines were not followed, particularly by those translators who were in high demand.

In the 20th century, the structures in translation became firmer and modern translators learned from their mistakes in the past and corrected them. They wanted translations that not only converted the content into another language but translate its context as well so that readers could better understand the original author's message. Learn more about the history of translations in our specially created infographic

The History of Translations (Past, Present and Future) #infographic
infographic by: daytranslations.com

Share This Infographic On Your Site

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